Fitting Your Face

The best mask for your face shape (updated August 2020).

Fitting a face mask isn’t like fitting a corset or vest — there’s really only couple of dimensions you need to worry about.  It’s really as much a matter of your personal preference as it is of your facial features.  But there are some factors which can makes certain styles work much better for you than others. 

If you’re not sure which style of mask would suit you best, you might want to refer to these blog entries for some more clues:

Other than that, here are some guidelines:

“Put On a Good Face” Contoured Masks

Try the Adult “Put on a Good Face” mask (High Fit) if:

  • Your nose is relatively prominent (your nose might be described as “Roman” or “aquiline”) and/or you have a high nose bridge
  • Your mid-face comes forward more, relative to the sides of your face (when you buy sunglasses, the more curved ones fit you better than the flatter ones)
  • You don’t mind the feeling of fabric resting lightly on your face

Try the Adult “Put on a Good Face” mask (Low Fit) if:

  • Your nose is short, low-bridged, or if you might describe yourself as having a “button nose”
  • Your mid-face is relatively flat (sunglasses that lie flat when you put them lenses-down fit you better than ones that curve up a lot)
  • You like a snugger fit, or the feeling of soft cottony goodness touching your face all over

The Adult XS/Tween fit of “Put on a Good Face” mask is intended for adults with really small faces, pre-teens, or younger teenagers.

The Child fit of “Put on a Good Face” mask is for children whom you trust completely to:

  • Not eat, chew, or choke on a mask
  • Tell you at once if they have trouble breathing through the mask, or feel any other discomfort
  • Safely put on, take off, and put the mask in the laundry after wearing, and wash their hands before/after each step
  • Totally get the reason you want them to wear a mask, even if they just want to play superhero
  • Understand that if they’re wearing a mask to help protect someone else, they have to observe correct wearing procedure, as outlined by you (for example, they can’t pull it off before sneezing because their nose itched).

Children generally have fairly low nose bridges, at least enough not to interfere with the fit much; however, if you think yours need a different shape, email us.  Read the FAQs thoroughly before you consider putting your child in a mask.  Actually, read them thoroughly anyway even if you aren’t.

Mask Styles with Wire Nose-Piece Options

Try the Accordion mask if:

  • You have a relatively long face or chin
  • Your cheekbones are not prominent or wide, and your face is proportionately narrow
  • You have a beard that needs more coverage, or stubble that catches and pulls down masks when you talk
  • You need a nose wire to make the mask conform around a tall or sharp nose bridge

Try the Ziggurat mask if:

  • You have a relatively long face or chin, or a beard that needs more lower face coverage
  • You need more height and air space between your nose and mouth and the mask
  • Your mask tends to get damp from sweat or exhaled breath, and you want it held off your face
  • Your glasses (or sunglasses) tend to fog up in other mask styles
  • You have a beard that needs more coverage, or stubble that catches and pulls down masks when you talk
  • You need a nose wire to make the mask conform around a tall or sharp nose bridge

3D Mask Styles

For Ziggurat mask recommendations, see above (under “Mask styles with wire nose piece option”)

Try the Anteater mask if:

  • You like a LOT of air space between you and the mask
  • You have a short to moderate length face without a prominent chin
  • The bridge of your nose is relatively blunt (not super-sharp or aquiline)
  • You dislike pressing pleats after laundering
  • Your mask tends to get damp from sweat or exhaled breath, and you want it held off your face
  • You you find nose wires uncomfortable or unnecessary

For Your Reference

We’re using Felix and Kitty to illustrate some points of fit and facial structure, since their face shapes are about as opposite as it’s possible for two face shapes to be.

Here are some photos of Felix, who has a long, narrow face, a tall nose and high sharp nose bridge, and a very forward mid-face (with and without a mask).  This mask is the “Put on a good face” style, which he finds rests too close to his nose and mouth for his face shape. 

Here are some photos of Kitty for comparison, who has a short, round face with a short “button” nose, wide prominent cheekbones, flat mid-face profile, and a low blunt nose bridge.  This mask style works much better for her face structure, though it can feel clammy in hot weather and restrictive with exertion. 

For your reference, Felix finds that masks often form gaps around the top, so his glasses fog up, unless they have a bendable nose wire to force the mask fabric to conform around the sharper angle of his nose bridge.  He finds it much easier to breathe in the Ziggurat mask, which creates a lot of extra air space over his tall nose and his mouth; also, the pleats give him the extra coverage he needs to make sure the mask doesn’t pull down due to his longer face and beard stubble. 

<PHOTO of Felix in Ziggurat mask>

Kitty, in contrast, finds that contoured masks that rest closer to the face are fine for her under most conditions (she takes a Low fit in the “Put on a good face” mask).  A nose wire tends to be redundant on this face shape, sometimes even uncomfortable, since fabric has little trouble molding itself around the moderate curve of the nose bridge.  Also, pleats are usually not necessary for lower face coverage since there isn’t a lot of length to cover.  If it’s very hot or if she’s exerting herself and needs to take deeper breaths, the Anteater mask is a better option than the closer-fitting “Put on a good face” mask, since the 3D shape lifts the fabric off the breathing passages and provides extra air space without needing a nose wire for structure.

While we can make generalized recommendations based on your facial structure and needs, you can’t really be sure how a face mask style will work for you until you try it.  So if you’re really not sure which you’d prefer, consider trying one of each.  You may find that one or more types work for you, perhaps for different situations, activities, temperature or weather conditions. 

Then you can donate the ones you don’t like as much to someone in need (after sanitizing, of course) and pick up a few of the kind you prefer, since you really need to launder any mask after each and every wearing.  We are matching each mask purchased with one we donate to someone in need, so you’ll be helping others while you figure out what you need.